Bathroom Safety Tips For Seniors

  • January 22, 2020
    Bathroom Safety Tips For Seniors

    Did you know that one in four Americans who are over the age of 65 fall each year? That means that your aging parent or family member who lives home alone without a home health care Omaha caregiver can be at risk. The last thing you want is for them to fall anywhere in their home, especially in the bathroom, where they have no way to ask for help. 

    Why are bathrooms so dangerous for seniors?

    Bathrooms are one of the most dangerous rooms for seniors! These rooms can be small and cramped making it hard for seniors to move around without a problem. It can be even more difficult for seniors who have limited mobility. 

    In addition, bathrooms are prone to water spillage. If the floors get wet, they can become slippery and put seniors at risk of falling on the hard bathroom surfaces. It’s important to remember that seniors don’t have the ability to balance like they did in the past. 

    Bathroom Safety Tips For Seniors 

    The good news is that if you have a senior loved one who lives at home alone, you can keep them safe. Here are four bathroom safety tips that you can follow to prevent them from falling and getting injured.

    Clear the clutter 

    Bathrooms are tiny enough to have them filled with rugs, towels and trash cans. Seniors need to be able to move freely because a lack of space can put them at risk of tripping. You want to make sure that there isn’t anything blocking their walkways. 

    Our home health care Omaha professionals suggest that you remove any rugs that are on the floor. Move the trash cans to the walls to allow for more walk space. Add a basket/hamper along the wall so they can place dirty towels or clothing inside instead of having them on the floor. 

    Install handles

    Accidents can happen when you least expect it. The best thing is to prevent them from happening. One way to help seniors from falling in a shower, tub or off a toilet is by installing handles.

    Grab bars or handles give your aging parent extra assistance when using the toilet, getting into a tub or standing in the shower. This kind of assistance can give you the reassurance that your elderly loved one will not slip so easily. 

    Add lighting 

    Seniors don’t have the same eyesight as they once did when they were younger. Sometimes they can become visually impaired with age or because of an illness. If their bathroom lacks lighting, they can be at risk for tripping or falling over, especially at night. 

    To prevent any accidents from occurring, it’s recommended to add additional lighting. Make light switches accessible for them to reach. It would be best if you considered installing lights that automatically turn on when it gets dark.

    Hire an in-home caregiver

    Research has found that seniors who have good hygiene have a much more positive attitude. If you have loved one who lives at home alone and needs extra assistance taking a bath, it’s time to hire an in-home caregiver. 

    These care professionals will assist seniors in everything from bathing to toileting needs. When your senior loved one has limited mobility it’s important to have someone navigate around a bathroom. Caregivers can also assist in shaving, brushing hair and other grooming needs. 

    Give your parents and yourself the ease of mind by hiring a home health care Omaha  caregiver. Set up a consultation to see how we can help. 

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